Rees Morrison, Esq., is an expert consultant to general counsel on management issues. Visit his website, ReesMorrison.com, write Rees@ReesMorrison(dot)com, or call him at 973.568.9110.
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    « Streamlining by scanning and reengineering (leases at Food Lion) | Main | Evaluating law firm performance and giving hard-data feedback to firms (Royal Bank Canada) »

    Having in-house counsel track time (NYC’s law department)

    In-house lawyers who do not track their time detest, abhor and revile the thought of doing so. “If I wanted to record 10ths of an hour, I’d have stayed at a law firm!!”

    I smiled, therefore, when I read that the Corporation Counsel of NYC’s accomplishments included “implementing, over significant internal opposition, a requirement that attorneys keep time records, a reform intended to give [law] department managers a better idea of the resources devoted to the needs of its ‘clients’ – city government agencies.” (emphasis added) (NY Law J. Aug. 15, 2005)

    With 650 lawyers in that department, the need for data on how lawyers are spending their time becomes imperative. For small law departments, those under five lawyers, I doubt the efficiency of tracking time. For intermediate size departments, tracking time in hour increments, or only for a quarter a year, or only on certain kinds of matters, gives most of the insights with less of the angst. For large departments, as many as 40 percent track attorney time and I recommend it

    Posted on August 31, 2005 at 09:28 AM in Productivity | Permalink

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    » Tracking time and billing from Inside Opinions: Legal Blogs
    Rees Morrison at Law Department Management reports that the NYC Law Department has started (over significant dissent) requiring its 650 attorneys to keep track of their time. The department has also started sending hypothetical bills to city agencies f... [Read More]

    Tracked on Aug 31, 2005 5:48:25 PM

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